http://www.bettycjung.net/Hemethods.htm

Annotated Health Education Methods Bibliography




Suggested Citation: Jung, B.C. (1999 - 2017). Annotated Health Education Methods Bibliography.
Web document: http://www.bettycjung.net/Hemethods.htm

TOPICS:


PROGRAM PLANNING (N = 9)


Abel, K., Buszewicz, M, Davison, S., Johnson, S., Staples, E. (1996). Planning Community Mental Health Services for Women. A Multiprofessional Handbook. London: Routledge. A comprehensive overview of what to consider in develop mental health services for women, from counseling to in-patient psychiatric services, with contributions from a variety of social service professionals. Much of the research into the social problems faced by women can be used to develop PUBLIC HEALTH services for women.

Cottrell, R.R., Girvan, J.T., McKenzie, J.F.(2009). Principles and Foundations of Health Promotion and Education. CA: Pearson Benjamin Cummings. The definitive basic textbook that covers what health promotion and health education is all about. Early chapters provide a background of health education as a profession, a history of health and health education, philosophical and theoretical foundations as well as ethics and health education. A chapter covers the credentialing of health educators, and subsequent chapters cover settings where health educators may work in, agencies they may deal with, health education literature and future trends regarding the health education profession. If you are thinking of becoming a health educator, then you should read this textbook.

Green, L.W., Kreuter, M.W., Deeds, S.G., & Partridge, K.B. (1980). Health Education Planning: A Diagnostic Approach. CA: Mayfield Publishing Co. The Community Health Education classic that is a must-read for anyone who wants to a certified health education specialist (CHES). The emphasis on the theory behind program planning will allow you to understand much of the health education research being conducted today.

Hale, C.D., Arnold, F., & Travis, M.T. (1994). Planning and Evaluating Health Programs. A Primer. . NY: Delmar Publishing Inc. An excellent basic text for the certified health education specialist. How-to chapters on writing proposals, budgets, planning documents. Will help you to understand how all SCSU's courses contribute to the theory behind the skills needed to be a health educator. Covers program planning, evaluation; health planning methods: demography, epidemiology, health services research, budgeting, implementation strategies; management information systems. Includes two sample written plans.

Luntz, F. (2007). Words that Work. It's not What You Say, It's What People Hear. NY: Hyperion. Luntz is a political consultant whose sideline is studying how language impacts the message. Through the use of focus groups and other qualitative methods, he has come up with ways to get the message across to the audience he wants to reach. But his manta throughout the book is "It's not what you say, it's what people hear," which is sage advice for any health educator trying to get a message across. The book is worth reading if you can overlook his partisan views.

Mailbach, E., & Marrott, R.L. (editors) (1995). Designing Health Messages. . CA: Sage Publications. An excellent literature review approach to developing health education/health promotion campaigns to get your health message across. An excellent attempt in showing how to apply health behavior theory to the real-world application of health education in a world of the multiple subpopulations you want to reach. Can we change health behavior? It depends.

McKenzie, J.F., Neiger, B.L, & Thackeray, R. (2009). Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs. A Primer. Fifth Edition. San Francisco, CA: Pearson Benjamin Cummings. Remains the definitive textbook for program planning, implementation and evaluation. This textbook contains updates from previous editions regarding the revised areas of responsibility and competencies for certified health education specialists, expanded sections about the Generalized Model for Program Planning, intervention mapping, program rationale writing, new data collection processes, measurement and sampling, the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA), the Community Readiness Model (CRM), best practices and intervention development, mapping community capacity, budget preparation, grant funding, safety and ethical issues surrounding program implementation, purposes for evaluation, process evaluation and pre- and pilot-testing.

McKenzie, J.F., & Smeltzer, J.L. (1997). Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs. A Primer. Second Edition. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. THE BEST BOOK FOR DEVELOPMENT OF HEALTH PROMOTION/EDUCATION PROGRAMS FROM PLANNING TO EVALUATION. The most comprehensive text on the actual nuts and bolts for development health education programs, from conducting needs assessments, to evaluating how effective your program actually is in meeting the need so your targeted audience.

National Cancer Institute. (2005). Theory At a Glance; This free publication, based on the work of Drs. Barbara K. Rimer and Karen Glanz, provides a succinct, yet comprehensive textbook on health behavior theories and concepts that everyone working in Public Health should read and know. Explanations are to the point and supported by examples that practitioners can relate to. What I found most useful are Table 11, "Summary of Theories: Focus and Key Concepts" and Figure 10, "Using Theory to Plan Multilevel Interventions." Both will provide basic information, at a glance, of what you need to think about when planning a public health program.


ASSESSMENT (N =6)


Gronlund, N.E. (1993). How to Make Achievement Tests and Assessments. Fifth Edition. A basic how-to book in developing valid and reliable tests and how to use tests to assess success in education. Good chapter on how to evaluate your test instrument for reliability and how to report on test results.

Henerson, M.E., Morris, L.L., & Fitz-Gibbons, C.T. (1987). How to Measure Attitudes. A how-to on measuring attitude changes that may result from program participation. Covers such various approaches as: self-reporting, report of others, sociometric procedures, and using existing program records. Sections on using existing measures and how to create your own. An excellent chapter on the issue of validity and reliability of measures.

King, J.A., Morris, L.L., & Fitz-Gibbons, C.T. (1987). How to Assess Program Implementation. A how-to on evaluating a program in progress. How to collect and analyze such diverse data sources as program records, responses to questionnaires, interviews, and observational notes. An excellent appendix of 300 questions you should ask of a program's implementation.

Martin, L.L. & Kettner, P.M. (1996). Measuring the Performance of Human Service Programs. CA: Sage Publications. AN EXCELLENT PRIMER FOR DEVELOPING PERFORMANCE MEASURES. The perspective is more social service, but the idea of performance measurement is generic when it comes to any public program that is supposed to make a difference for the public it serves. If you think outcome performance and output performance measures are the same except for the spelling, then you need to read this book.

Morris, L.L., Fitz-Gibbon, C.T., & Lindheim, E. (1987). How to Measure Performance and Use Tests. A how-to on the use of measuring performance for program evaluation. From determining appropriateness to constructing your own test instrument, and considering the validity and reliability of any test instrument. An excellent text for those involved with educational programs.

University of Maryland/EDMS410. (Fall, 1996). Principles of Testing and Evaluation (Classroom Assessment). A collection of readings for a college senior-level course on developing evaluation methods, from standard exams to conducting portfolio assessments of students. Good for teachers interested in coming up with fair grades for their students.


EVALUATION (N = 11)


Austin, M. J. & Assoc. (1982). Evaluating Your Agency's Programs. CA: Sage Publications. A great hands-on manual on how to go about conducting program evaluations. You get to learn from people who know what they are talking about.

Cartin, T.J. (1993). Principles & Practices of TQM. Milwaukee, WI: ASQC Quality Press. Believe it or not, Quality is not only a health-based concept. It became the foundation for an engineering perspective that seeks to proactively address poor manufacturing processes by taking a preventive rather than just a corrective approach. (Hmmm, sounds like Public Health to me.) Quality became the core concept for a whole industry philosophy known as Total Quality Management (TQM). Though written by an electrical engineer, it's actually not that technical that you wouldn't understand it without an engineering degree. A good in-depth but not too overwhelming intro to the whole concept of TQM as it is being applied in Industry today. If you happen to be working in a setting that's trying to adopt TQM, don't be too surprised that it's not being done right. According to Cartin, it can take up to 5 years to implement, and that's with the cooperation of everyone in the entire organization. But, it does work and makes any company that adopts it a lean and mean machine that's competitive enough to survive in a lean and mean competitive marketplace.

I can't see TQM happening in any bureaucracy with more than two levels in the hierarchy (and that's a rarity if there ever was such an organization that would consider itself a bureaucracy). You should thank your lucky stars that the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) ever got passed in 1993. Now at least government agencies will have to make an effort to be accountable to the Public. Though not exactly TQM, it will probably take at least 5 years, if not longer to see some results.

TQM probably works best when a business that started off as a mom and pop enterprise turns out to be a smashing commercial success that it can't help but expand. In this kind of fertile environment TQM can really provide a good framework for business growth so that bureaucracies do not take over and snuff out the originality and creativity of the moms and pops who started them out to begin with.

Dever, G.E.A. (1997). Improving Outcomes in Public Health Practice. MD: Aspen Publications. THE BEST TEXT FOR USING TQM METHODOLOGIES IN PUBLIC HEALTH. Simply the best in applying the principles of total quality management to public health practice. Generous examples of how to apply such methods as control charts to evaluating the effectiveness of public health programs.

Gronlund,N.E. (1998). Assessment of Student Achievement.MA: Allyn & Bacon. Ever wonder how your teacher came up those exams? This is a how-to develop exams of all kinds. A comprehensive text on test methods.

Kosecoff, J., & Fink, A. (1982). Evaluation Basics. A Practitioner's Guide. CA: Sage Publications. Excellent for research design.

Lorig, K., Stewart, A., Ritter, P., Gonzalez, V., Laurent, D., & Lynch, J. (1996). Outcome Measures for Health Education and other Health Care Interventions. CA: Sage Publications. The appendices are the most useful part of this text, which extrapolates from the authors' experiences with the Chronic Disease Management Program. Samples of various health measurement surveys are included with some information about how to use them for evaluating health education programs.

Martin, L.L. & Kettner, P.M. (1996). Measuring the Performance of Human Service Programs. CA: Sage Publications. AN EXCELLENT PRIMER FOR DEVELOPING PERFORMANCE MEASURES. The perspective is more social service, but the idea of performance measurement is generic when it comes to any public program that is supposed to make a difference for the public it serves. If you think outcome performance and output performance measures are the same except for the spelling, then you need to read this book.

Patton, M.Q. (1987). How to Use Qualitative Methods in Evaluation. #4 of The Program Evaluation Kit, 2nd Edition. A comprehensive how-to on qualitative research methods as fieldwork, observation and depth interviewing, as well as how to analyze qualitative data. Qualitative methods are gaining respectability in research circles as quantitative methods have been found to be inadequate in explaining phenomena that don't necessarily follow linear patterns.

Rossi, P.H., & Freeman, H.E. (1985). Evaluation. A Systematic Approach. CA: Sage Publications. Good for applying statistics to designing research.

Royse,D., Thyer,B. & Padgett, D. (2010). Program Evaluation: An Introduction, 5th Ed. Cengage Publication. An excellent textbook that covers everything you need to know about conducting program evaluation. Offers hands-on insight on many facet of evaluation practice.

Sarvela, P.D., & McDermott, R.J. (1993). Health Education Evaluation and Measurement. A Practitioner's Perspective. WI: WCB Brown & Benchmark. THE BEST BOOK ON EVALUATION FOR HEALTH EDUCATORS. Yes - we all should be conducting evaluations, but we don't do it often enough because it is time-consuming. For people who don't like to hear bad news or are unwilling to change their methods, evaluation is as awful as performance assessments, which we have all experienced as students at report card time. For those who are interested in self-knowledge and want to know if they are truly making a difference with what they do, then program evaluations are second nature, and offer opportunities to improve what we are doing. This excellent text covers everything you need to know about how to evaluate your interventions. And, yes, you can use scientific approaches, which are explained at the level you don't need to be a biostatistician to understand.


PROGRAM EVALUATION SKILLS-BUILDING SERIES (N = 9)


Program Evaluation Kit. (1987) Second Edition. CA:Sage Publications, Inc.

#1. Herman, J.L., Morris, L.L., & Fitz-Gibbons, C.T. (1987). Evaluator's Handbook. An excellent how-to book on how to conduct evaluation research. Using a work-sheet approach, authors walk the reader through the entire process of formative and summative evaluations.

#2. Stecher, B.M., & Davis, W.A. (1987). How to Focus an Evaluation. A how-to manual on choosing an appropriate evaluation approach. Covers: Experimental, Goal-oriented, Decision-focused, User-oriented, and Responsive approaches. Excellent descriptions.

#3. Fitz-Gibbon, C.T., & Morris, L.L. (1987). How to Design a Program Evaluation. A how-to on designing evaluation studies. Covers Control Group, Time Series and Before-After designs. An excellent chapter on randomizing your population using the HRD (handy randomizing deck) technique.

#4. Patton, M.Q. (1987). How to Use Qualitative Methods in Evaluation. A comprehensive how-to on qualitative research methods as fieldwork, observation and depth interviewing, as well as how to analyze qualitative data. Qualitative methods are gaining respectability in research circles as quantitative methods have been found to be inadequate in explaining phenomena that don't necessarily follow linear patterns.

#5. King, J.A., Morris, L.L., & Fitz-Gibbons, C.T. (1987). How to Assess Program Implementation. A how-to on evaluating a program in progress. How to collect and analyze such diverse data sources as program records, responses to questionnaires, interviews, and observational notes. An excellent appendix of 300 questions you should ask of a program's implementation.

#6. Henerson, M.E., Morris, L.L., & Fitz-Gibbons, C.T. (1987). How to Measure Attitudes. A how-to on measuring attitude changes that may result from program participation. Covers such various approaches as: self-reporting, report of others, sociometric procedures, and using existing program records. Sections on using existing measures and how to create your own. An excellent chapter on the issue of validity and reliability of measures.

#7. Morris, L.L., Fitz-Gibbon, C.T., & Lindheim, E. (1987). How to Measure Performance and Use Tests. A how-to on the use of measuring performance for program evaluation. From determining appropriateness to constructing your own test instrument, and considering the validity and reliability of any test instrument. An excellent text for those involved with educational programs.

#8. Fitz-Gibbon, C.T. & Morris, L.L. (1987). How to Analyze Data. An excellent how-to book on the analysis of data. Covers descriptive statistics, differences between groups, relationships between variables, analyzing questionnaires, choosing the right statistical procedure, and gives an overview of meta analysis.

#9. Morris, L.L., Fitz-Gibbon, C.T., & Freeman, M.E. (1987). How to Communicate Evaluation Findings. A how-to on presenting findings from evaluation research, covering oral and written presentations to the fine art of getting program planners to actually use your findings to improve their programs.


PUBLISHED ON THE WEB: December 3, 1999; February 23, 2001 Updated: 12/18/2016 R92



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